Radio programme [from Audio visual source using OSCOLA]

Overview

A publishing recording of a programme may vary from the broadcast version, so if this is what you have heard, it is appropriate to reference it as such. In order that the source should be recoverable, it is more appropriate to give the publisher of the CD or audio cassette rather than the production company or broadcaster of the originally broadcast programme. The speaker (if a direct quote) or presenter, or both, take the place of the author and the words "Radio broadcast " are added in square brackets after the title of the programme. The format of the recording is given in square brackets following this.

Provide the web address and the date of access if you downloaded or accessed the recording via the web. Bear in mind some broadcasters websites offer only time-limited access to broadcasts and if possible, find a more stable source such as Box of Broadcasts.

Standard Form

Speaker (if a direct quote)/Presenter, 'Title of the programme' (Radio station, date of the programme)

or

Speaker (if a direct quote)/Presenter, 'Title of the programme' (Radio station, date of the programme) <Web address> accessed date.

Examples

Lucy Ash, 'Crossing continents' (BBC Radio 4, 17 July 2003) <news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/programmes/crossing_continents/3052318.stm> accessed 10 September 2004.

Simon Tonking, ‘Jury Trial’ (BBC Radio 4, 1 May 2010) <www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b00s3gq7> accessed 15 February 2013.

Reference List

Radio programmes are secondary sources and should be listed alphabetically by Speaker/Presenter in the Secondary Sources section of your Reference List.

No full stop is required at the end of an entry in a Reference List as this is a list.

Notes

  • If there is no obvious speaker/presenter, begin the reference with the title of the programme.
  • If the full date is not available, use the year alone.
  • If the programme is part of a series include series title in publication detail
  • Tracing full details needed for a reference after the broadcast can be difficult. The best source of information is TRILT (Television and Radio Index for Learning and Teaching) which gives details of television and radio programmes schedules from 2001 onwards for over 330 different channels plus a substantial selection of terrestrial television programmes back to 1995 or for more recent programmes check Box of Broadcasts.

This source is not covered by the OSCOLA style manual. Suggestions on this page are modelled on FAQs on the OSCOLA website (http://www.law.ox.ac.uk/publications/oscola_faqs.php#radio) but have not yet been discussed and approved by the OSCOLA editorial board.

LIJ