Webpage [from Electronic source using Vancouver]

Overview

The details shown below have been compiled in conjunction with the National Library of Medicine's Citing Medicine, Citing Material on the Internet, Chapter 25:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/bv.fcgi?rid=citmed.chapter.59231

This distinguishes between citing homepages and citing parts of websites. First determine that the item you are quoting cannot be cited alone as an electronic book, journal article etc. Then determine that the item you are quoting is not a homepage. Check for any authorship as this changes the format of the layout considerably: see the three given examples.

Webpages can be volatile and subject to unannounced change. Therefore, it is important include the internet address (or URL) for the webpage you accessed, as it may not be at that location when your work is assessed. A URL (Uniform Resource Locator) is the technical term for a webpage address. URLs can change, for example if the material you are viewing is generated 'on-the-fly' using content management software. URLs from these sites may be only viewable at the time of retrieval.

Whenever possible the URL you give should be a stable URL and link directly to the webpage itself. A stable URL, also known as a 'permament link' will not be generated 'on-the-fly' and is more likely to remain accessible. To check if a link to a URL is stable, paste the link into the address bar of an Internet browser to make sure that it works. If there is no stable URL for the item, give the homepage of the website.

Remember this will be a running number at the first use of a reference. If the reference is re-used then repeat the number allocated. Keep your style constant, either parenthesis (number) throughout, or superscript number. Do not change between the two. If your department recommends a particular style then use that.
For example:
Blood tests are not helpful in diagnosing superficial fungal infections.(15)
or
Blood tests are not helpful in diagnosing superficial fungal infections.15

 

Standard Form

Title [format statement]. Place: Publisher; Date (year month day). Title of part; date (year month day) [cited date (year month day)]; [length/pagination]. Available from:(url of part).

Examples

DermNet NZ [Internet]. Hamilton (New Zealand): New Zealand Dermatological Society Inc. March 2004-.Laboratory tests for fungal infection; 2003 [updated 2008 Mar 17; cited 2008 Oct 3]; [about 2 pages]. Available from: http://www.dermnetnz.org/fungal/fungi-laboratory.html

Diabetes UK [Internet]. London: Diabetes UK; c2008 Oct. Diabetic Ketoacidosis; 2008 [cited 2008 Oct 7]; [about 2 screens]. Available from http://www.diabetes.org.uk/Guide-to-diabetes/Complications/Short_term_complications/Diabetic_Ketoacidosis/

With given authorship entry becomes similar to a chapter in an edited book with part details given first instead of last:

Hicks R. Bornholm disease. [date unknown] - [reviewed 2007 Nov; cited 2008 Sep 23]. In: BBC Health [Internet]. London: BBC. 2008 Apr 4. [about 2 screens]. Available from: http://www.bbc.co.uk/health/conditions/bornholmdisease1.shtml

Citation in Text

Remember this will be a running number at the first use of a reference. If the reference is re-used then repeat the number allocated. Keep your style constant, either parenthesis (number) throughout, or superscript number. Do not change between the two. If your department recommends a particular style then use that.

The National Library for Health (16)

or

The National Library for Health16

Notes

Date of webpages:

  • Always try to give the date a webpage first appeared if it can be found. Look at "about us" or "history" pages. Try viewing source code. Follow this by revision date - use terminology of site but express date in usual Vancouver format e.g. [modified 2008 Feb 04]
  • Date of copyright is acceptable (preface with the c as in example above) if no publication date can be found. Still follow this with revision information if available.
  • If no date appears on the item you are trying to reference, insert [date unknown] where you would normally give the year.