Television: single programme [from Audio visual source using OSCOLA]

Overview

This is an interpretation of OSCOLA guidance. Check with your lecturer before using this suggestion, which is based on the scheme's guiding principles of consistency and consideration for the reader.

 

Standard Form

As a footnote:

Name of primary contributor -

the Director or Producer or Production Company [Role of primary contributor], 'Title of programme' [Television broadcast] (Additional information if required, Publisher, Year )

Examples

Pinpoint references

C Collinson-Jones [Director], 'Casualties of peace' [Television broadcast] 5.30-8.00 (Channel 4 2003).

K Glenaan [Director], 'Derailed' [Television broadcast] Comments by Network Rail spokesman (BBC 2005).

 

 

Podcast

British Medical Journal podcast, 'Insanity in the Dock' (20 July 2012) <www.bmj.com/podcast/2012/07/20/insanity-dock> accessed 15 April 2014.

Television Broadcast

C Collinson-Jones [Director], 'Casualties of peace' [Television broadcast] (Channel 4 2003).

Television Broadcast

K Glenaan [Director], 'Derailed' [Television broadcast] (BBC 2005).

YouTube

Dr Douglas Guilfoyle, ‘The UN Convention on the Law of the Sea: Origins and Importance’ (14 August 2013) <www.youtube.com/watch?v=3SOqz1Yu8tY> accessed 15 April 2014.

Reference List

List television programmes alphabetically by the first primary contributor's surname under the heading Secondary Sources.

No full stop is required at the end of an entry in a Reference List as this is a list.

In your bibliography, the primary contributor's surname should precede his or her initial(s), with no comma separating them, but a comma after the first initial. Only initials should be used, not forenames, e.g.

Glenaan K [Director], 'Derailed' [Television broadcast] (BBC 1 2005)

Notes

  • Tracing the details needed for a reference after the broadcast can be difficult. The best source of information is TRILT (Television and Radio Index for Learning and Teaching) which gives details of television and radio programmes schedules from 2001 onwards for over 330 different channels plus a substantial selection of terrestrial television programmes back to 1995.